SAT Writing Only

New SAT Writing (as of 2016)

SAT Writing Now & Then

 

Command of Evidence (This is what the SAT requests, and this is what we will teach!)

When students take the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and Essay sections of the redesigned SAT, they’ll be asked to demonstrate their ability to interpret, synthesize, and use evidence found in a wide range of sources. . . . For every passage students read in the SAT Reading Test, there will be at least one question asking them to select a quote from the text that best supports the answer they have chosen in response to the preceding question. . . .

Questions in the SAT Writing and Language Test will also focus on command of evidence. Students will be asked to analyze sequences of paragraphs to make sure they are correct, grammatically and substantively. In some questions, students will be asked to interpret graphics and edit the accompanying passages so that they accurately convey the information in the graphics.

The Essay will also require students to demonstrate command of evidence. The focus of the Essay section on the redesigned SAT will be very different from the essay on the current SAT. Students will be asked to analyze a provided source text to determine how the author builds an argument to persuade an audience through the use of evidence, reasoning, and/or stylistic and persuasive devices and then to write a cogent and clear analysis supported by critical reasoning and evidence drawn from the source. This task more closely mirrors college writing assignments.

The new Essay section is designed to support high school students and teachers as they cultivate close reading, careful analysis, and clear writing. It will promote the practice of reading a wide variety of arguments and analyzing how authors do their work as writers.

The essay prompt will be shared in advance and remain consistent. Only the source material (passage) will change. The Essay will be an optional component of the SAT, although some school districts and colleges will require it.

Read more about command of evidence, and view a sample question.

Read more about essay analyzing a source, and view a sample question.

 

satThis class is for college bound students who are aiming for higher scores on SAT and better grades in all English related classes in high schools. The class curriculum is developed by Jessie Chen, the CEO of Taipei Debate Academy and Asian Debate League. She is a published author with a Cum Laude in English Literature, Summa Cum Laude in Masters in Teaching English, and a former college instructional aid and a high school English teacher. Jessie as the most competent and innovative English teacher in the United States is documented as she holds the record highest score on PRAXIS Exam.

This class is designed to force intellectual expansion of your child in a short period of time by 1) critically reading challenging philosophical literature, 2) writing interpretive critiques on the philosophical literature, 3) and analyzing and memorizing the SAT words and other advance vocabularies by applying JC’s innovative learning methods.

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Learning Objectives: 

  1. Learn to read critically.
  2. Learn to discuss critically.
  3. Learn to write critically.
  4. Learn SAT and other advance vocabularies.
  5. Learn conventional grammar.
  6. Learn academic writing techniques.
  7. Learn to write perfect A papers for all your school assignments.
 
Class Details:
  • Age Appropriateness:  8th grade and up
  • Program Duration: 15 weeks, 30 class hours
  • Class Duration & Frequency: 2 hours, once a week
  • Class Size: 6 students minimum, 10 students maximum
Tuition – Taiwan:
  • Tuition: NT$ 31,500.00
  • Payment Policy:
    • Pay in advance
    • Pay Cash
    • No refund